About St. Anne Parish

St. Anne Parish originally comprised twenty square miles, from 12 Mile to 16 Mile Roads, and from Dequindre to Schoenherr. Due to the enormous growth of the City of Warren, other Parishes were established.

What St. Anne lost in territory was gained in population. In 1945, 210 families were registered in the Parish.

THE FIRST CHURCH . . . .

Exterior of St. Anne Chapel. The Village Barn was purchased by the people of St. Anne and was renovated and refurbished to serve as their first church. The first Mass was offered in the new chapel on Easter Sunday, 1946. The building was erected in the early 1930's by John Warner, one of the early settlers of the Village of Warren. From 1935 to 1945 it was a meeting place for old and young who enjoyed old-time square dances. The building at one time was the home of the well known WJBK "Barn Dance" Program.

Exterior of St. Anne Chapel.

The first church was the Warren Village Barn, which was purchased for $14,000. The first Mass was said in the remodeled barn Easter Sunday, April, 1946. At that time there were 225 families. Furnishings of the chapel came from many quarters: Main Altar Candlesticks from Annunciation Church, Detroit; Side Altar from Augustine, Richmond; Floor Coverings from Fisher Building, Detroit; Vestments from Sacred Heart, Imlay City; Statue from St. Patrick’s, Wyandotte; pews from St. Juliana, Detroit. Original Monstrance, Missal and chairs from Fr. John Ryan of the Confraternity Office.

 

 

THE SECOND CHURCH . . . .

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St. Anne Auditorium Church.

The construction of the second church began in April, 1953, and was completed around September for an estimated cost of $150,000. The building was an Auditorium/Gymnasium type to be used as a temporary church (today this serves as the St. Anne Catholic Grade School gym).

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERMANENT HOME…

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Groundbreaking for our permanent home

In 1962, the thinking turned towards a new permanent Church. After permission was granted by the Archbishop of Detroit, the firm of Charles M. Valentine and Associates of Marysville, Michigan was engaged to design the new Church.

When plans and specifications were finally approved, bids were sent to ten qualified contractors. The time-honored firm of Clarence Gleeson Incorporated was the successful bidder as General Contractor.

Ground for the new Church was broken on April 5th, 1964, and the twenty-year dream became a reality.

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DEDICATION A JOYOUS SUCCESS . . . .

The ceremony on Saturday, August 21st, was a spectacular combination of sights, sounds and people. Many visitors added to the joy of the occasion. We were honored by the presence of Archbishop John F. Dearden, and his Secretary, Father Joseph Imesch. Fathers Bernard Crowley and Raymond Clancy served as Chaplains to the Archbishop. Father Frederick Delaney, in his inspiring sermon, pointed out to us the meaning of the occasion. Many priests and sisters, old friends of the Parish, shared in the celebration. It was a thrill to see members from our neighboring churches join in the spirit of the day. The visiting Ministers were Reverends Ken Brand, Wallace Zink, John Baumgartner, John Salles, Ray Cover, and John Bergman.

 

THE FUTURE . . . .

As with every large parish, St. Anne has seen a lot of growth and activity through the years. Every summer the parish has had a considerable amount of repair work done. With building and facilities getting older, upkeep and maintenance is no small and inexpensive task. The entire sewer system of our parish was replaced. The elementary school has been repainted. Grounds around the school were restored to their original setting. Even more work will be planned for the future.

St. Anne Catholic Community is still expanding.

Well into the new millennium, St. Anne is actively continuing its ecclesial mission begun 70 years ago. The serious involvement of so many in the educational, athletic, social and service groups of the parish community attest to our busy successful past, productive present, and bright future in God’s provident care.

The most important part regarding our parish history is that it is a living history. Our parish is a living people who owe much to the past while holding a firm and positive view of the years to come. With God’s help we can continue the work that has been handed down to us — continuing to be a sign of his presence in our world.

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